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THE SOIL BLOCK RECIPE THAT ACTUALLY HOLDS TOGETHER

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If you’ve been thinking about trying soil blocking, you might have found that there are an overwhelming amount of soil blocking recipes online. But which one is the best option for seed starting? I’ve experimented with several different recipes so you don’t have to!

In this post, I’ll break down the pros and cons of soil blocking, the best recipe to make sure your soil blocks don’t fall apart, and my tips and tricks to get the most out of your soil blocking experience! Let’s get into it.

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WHAT IS SOIL BLOCKING?

Soil blocking is essentially the manual process of making soil blocks. This is done by packing a handheld tool called a soil blocker with a soil mixture (more on this below) and manually pressing that mixture into blocks. You can then plant your seeds in these blocks, place a tray of them under a grow light, and begin the germination process! With the proper technique, soil blocking can be a fun, easy way to seed start which eliminates the need for various seed starting pots and sowing trays.

PROS & CONS OF SOIL BLOCKING

PROS

  • healthier root systems are produced through air pruning and an increase in oxygen
  • no transplant shock–some plants don’t like to be bumped up in their seed containers or moved once they’re started. if you soil block, your roots stay in the same container and it’s easier for the plant to climatize to life outdoors
  • the ability to start more seeds indoors
  • ease of transplant into the garden
  • reduced use of plastic containers
  • the ability to save money in the long run

CONS

  • the initial cost of the soil blocking equipment
  • not ideal for larger vegetables like pumpkins or squash
  • can be a little more time consuming than other methods
  • a sharper learning curve initially than traditional seed starting

WHAT SUPPLIES DO YOU NEED TO SOIL BLOCK?

These are the basic supplies to get started on your soil blocking journey:

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WHAT IS THE BEST SOIL BLOCKING RECIPE? 

I recently experimented with a variety of soil blocking recipes to find out which soil block recipe would work best for my gardening needs. I tried plain potting soil, plain seed starting mix, the classic Eliot Coleman recipe, and a version of the Eliot Coleman recipe with coconut coir, a more sustainable alternative to peat moss.

While there was no clear winner, as you’ll see in this video, I did find that the best results came from ingredients that were as finely milled as possible. That being said, if you don’t have a lot of time, I would suggest using a seed starting mix. If you’ve got the time, the coconut coir mix stands out as the mix I will use again in the future. I would stand by any of these mixtures though, as long as you use the correct watering technique and tightly pack the cubes.

TIPS FOR KEEPING SOIL BLOCKS FROM FALLING APART

The best method for keeping ¾ inch soil blocks moist is to use a spray bottle. Misting soil blocks with water helps hold them together and prevents them from drying up and crumbling.

When you’re bottom watering, in general, leave a space in your soil blocks to pour the water so it doesn’t immediately hit the soil. If you pour the water this way, they shouldn’t fall apart. Be warned: if you pour the water directly into the center of the blocks, they will break apart. 

There you have it! My tips and tricks for seed-starting with soil blockers. Have you tried soil blocking in the past? I’d love to hear in the comments about your experiences!


NEED MORE HELP IN THE GARDEN?

Green thumbs aren’t just given out at birth. They’re a combination of learning about gardening and trial and error. If you wish you knew more about gardening and had more confidence in your abilities, you need the Growing Roots Gardening Guide

It’s an e-book plus 6 bonuses–everything you need to go from complete garden newb to confident in one growing season. Get all the details of what’s inside here. Happy gardening!


Kristen Raney

Kristen Raney

Kristen is a former farm kid turned urban gardener who owns the popular gardening website, Shifting Roots.  She is obsessed with growing flowers and pushing the limits of what can be grown in her zone 3b garden.  She also loves to grow tomatoes, but oddly enough, dislikes eating them raw.

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Kristen

Welcome!

Hi, I'm Kristen and I help new gardeners learn to grow their own vegetables and beautify their yards. I also share recipes that use all that delicious garden produce. Grab a coffee (and your gardening gloves) and join me for gardening tips, simple recipes, and the occasional DIY, all from the lovely city of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

P.S. First time gardener? You'll want to download the quick start gardening guide below!